The biggest reason why most shooters have inconsistent shot groups or miss their intended target, is POOR trigger control. We see it at EVERY camp we run and want to cover with you today, some training tips that will get you on target and keep you there with every round you send down range.

The following are some techniques to consider as a way to improve your trigger control: 

1. BUILD A GOOD GRIP

Improper grip and if the grip on your firearm is too large or small, your trigger finger will not be in the proper place to exert the proper force straight to the rear on the trigger. Build a proper grip at the initial stage of your draw. Generally, the firearm, your wrist and forearms should form a straight line if you have a proper grip. Adjust the grip size of your pistol if it has this feature. 

2. ISOLATE THE TRIGGER FINGER

Once you have built a proper grip, the index finger’s sole purpose is to pull the trigger.

Most shooters tend to tighten their grip during the trigger pull. Concentrate on moving just the index finger while maintaining the same grip pressure. 

3. FOCUS

Shooting accurately is as much a mental exercise as a physical one. Concentrate on your grip pressure and trigger pull. Think front sight…front sight…front sight as you deliberately pull the trigger straight to the rear. 

4. GO SLOW

Jerking and flinching is a product of rushing the trigger pull. Be fast out of the holster and acquiring sight alignment and sight picture but slow down on the trigger pull. Think smooth and steady pull versus a fast squeeze. Say in your head, “slow pull…slow pull…slow pull”.

5. SPEND A LOT OF TIME IN DRY FIRE PRACTICE

Dry firing is an excellent way to train for a proper trigger pull since there is no noise or recoil. This allows the shooter to focus solely on pulling the trigger without disrupting sight alignment and sight picture. Spend time dry firing from various positions like drawing from the holster, compressed ready or low ready etc. 

Utilize a SIRT product that resets the trigger so it allows you to pull the trigger multiple times without having to cycle the slide. This allows for a better feel of the trigger reset and builds muscle memory much better that pulling the trigger and having to cycle the slide. 

If you are interested in getting more training, you can checkout our LIVE Camps or get 30 days FREE of our online membership.

Stay Frosty,

Sgt Nick Rians